4 Ways to Build Better Communication

4 Ways to Build Better Communication

It’s time to communicate with one another better.

Together, we can make the world a better place.

Introduction 

The 21st century needs to be a century of communication. The modern world has become more polarized, which has given rise to the “with us or against us” mentality. We’re becoming more and more stuck in a bubble, surrounded by only people who share the same beliefs.

However, there are issues that affect the whole world and require global cooperation. We need to keep the channels of communication open and try to work together. Winnie and I talked about this in our latest podcast episode #22 Together, Stronger by Ride the Vibes

Read on to learn about some of our suggestions to build better communication and trust. 

One Global Community 

Issues like racism, xenophobia, and nationalism can cause us to revert to tribalism, and this turns anyone who might be different from us into an outsider who cannot be trusted. 

We need to try to view each other as humans, as members of one global community, and lastly, as people who can help out one another. 

This can be hard to do, but being open-minded, exploring new cultures, traveling, and standing up for equality and good values all contribute to a better world where we work together to solve problems that are bigger than any one country or social group.  

 

Garnering Diverse Relationships 

It turns out that spending time around people who hold different beliefs and values can actually increase empathy, and it can even relieve anxiety. On top of that, spending time in places with a less polarized crowd can actually make you less polarizing yourself. 

One way to successfully mingle with people who hold different beliefs is to curb the way you talk about contentious issues. Walking into the bar and immediately talking about politics is sure to draw a lot of groans and dissension

Instead, we need to come from a place of empathy and understanding. This might be a good chance to talk about the struggles you share, what commonalities you have, and it’s really just a great time to explore the fact that most people do want the world to be a better place and wish to be good people themselves. 

Get Out There and Vote 

It sounds cliché, but voting is a right that we should all exercise if we want the world to truly change. Elected officials often reflect the values of their voters and the local culture. If old people continue to outvote younger voters, we will get more government officials who represent the beliefs and values of the older generations. 

On top of voting, peaceful protests, contacting your local government officials about pertinent issues, and fighting against corruption all help with making positive change. Keep the politicians accountable and make sure your voice is being heard with your vote and the ability to utilize free speech. 

Social Media – Avoid political Affiliations 

Social media can be a huge catalyst for political arguments and cyberbullying. Part of the issue is that most people read only news or information aligned with their own beliefs and cherrypick information that fits into their own ideology

It could be wise to avoid posting political or controversial information on social media —for your own sanity—unless it is related to your job or an active hobby. 

My final solution is to expose yourself to more neutral groups. Studies show that when posts were linked to political parties, they stirred up more controversy. Just talking to others in a more neutral way or without using political associations might be a great way to start a more productive conversation rather than drumming up more arguments and polarization. 

Conclusion 

We can all make decisions that can affect positive change and open channels of communication.  Let’s work together to make this the century of communication and the end of extreme polarization. We all share this planet and its problems, no matter what group or country we come from, so let’s make a better world together. 

For more on culture and social change, read our blog: Is America a Melting Pot or a Salad Bowl? 

Presidential Candidate Andrew Yang Drops-In to Explain Himself to Ellen

Vocabulary 

1. polarized (adj.)

Def.  to break up into opposing factions or groupings

Ex. This polarized environment makes it hard to hold a productive conversation. 

2. nationalism (n.)

Def. loyalty and devotion to a nation

Ex. The president tried to imbue his citizens with a sense of nationalism in order to get votes. 

3. tribalism (n.)

Def.  strong in-group loyalty

Ex. The angry mob reverted to tribalism and attacked anyone who disagreed with them. 

4. curb (v.)

Def. check, restraint

Ex. She is trying to curb her smoking habit. 

5. contentious (adj.)

Def.   likely to cause disagreement or argument

Ex. Racial discrimination is still a contentious issue around the world. 

6. dissension (n.)

Def. disagreement 

Ex. His political rant brought nothing but dissension to the holiday dinner. 

7. pertinent (adj.)

Def. having a clear decisive relevance to the matter in hand

Ex. This fact is pertinent to understanding the larger issue. 

8. accountable (adj.)

Def. subject to giving an account: answerable 

Ex. It is important to keep politicians accountable by peacefully protesting against bad policies. 

9. catalyst (n.)

Def. an agent that provokes or speeds significant change or action

Ex. Feeling stuck can be a good catalyst for making big changes in your life. 

10. cherrypick (v.)

Def. to select the best or most desirable

Ex. The journalist cherrypicked quotes from the mayor’s speech. 

11. ideology (n.) 

Def. a manner or the content of thinking characteristic of an individual, group, or culture

Ex. Your political ideology doesn’t match mine, but we can still be friends. 

12. drum up (v.) 

Def. to bring about by persistent effort

Ex. The protesters tried to drum up support for their cause. 

Sources

https://www.bridgealliance.us/the_psychology_of_polarization_and_how_we_can_overcome_our_prejudices

https://theconversation.com/extreme-political-polarization-weakens-democracy-can-the-us-avoid-that-fate-105540

https://phys.org/news/2018-09-social-media-networks-political-polarization.html

Photos

Us-them-tribal-contest-compare by johnhain 

Star-wars-darth-wader-villain-darth by p2722754

Hands-world-map-global-earth by stokpic

Technology-smartphone-telephone by Erik_Lucatero

Video: shttps://tw.voicetube.com/videos/83119